LIFE AND RELATIONSHIP COACH

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Theresa Fearon, Life and Relationship Coach

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HOW TO RESOLVE CONFLICT IN YOUR MARRIAGE - FREE E-BOOK

Posted on 7 October, 2019 at 7:15

CHAPTER 1

Has the romance and passion gone out of your marriage and given way to “companionship”? Are you afraid that both of you might find other people more attractive? Chances are you’re reading this because you know the answer.


The purpose of this book is to share with you what accomplished marriage counsellors have to say about defusing the conflicts in your marriage. After all, you vowed to love each other for a lifetime, through all of the ups and the downs, right?


THE REALITY OF MARRIAGE


According to marriage counsellors, the major reason for the failure of marriage is the blind idealism that shrouds the reality of marriage. People are conditioned to believe that marriage is the solution to all their problems; that marriage involves sitting on a beach in the moonlight, holding hands at the movies, and seeing their beloved as the most beautiful and immaculate being in the world.


But when couples marry, other important concerns such as bills, mortgage, and dirty nappies enter the picture and suddenly romance flies out of the window.


In fact, those little idiosyncrasies that you found so appealing about your spouse have turned into irritants. What’s more, your partner may expect you to look after the kids, keep the house neat, cook sumptuous meals, be great in bed and even make some money. You may think you can’t do all that at once, and you’re right.


You expect your spouse to lend a helping hand in the kitchen, and at least once in a while, volunteer to look after the children. Naturally, according to you, your spouse should automatically remember your birthday and your wedding anniversary, refrain from leaving dirty clothes around, and take you out dancing after work – but most often it doesn’t work out this way, does it?!


The real question is: Do we expect too much from marriage?


“The bonds of matrimony are like any other bonds – they mature slowly.” - Peter De Vries